Call for Papers: Keystone DH

Temple University

This year’s Keystone DH will be held at Temple University in Philadelphia on July 8-10. Keystone DH is an annual conference and a network of institutions and practitioners committed to advancing collaborative scholarship in digital humanities research and pedagogy across the Mid-Atlantic.

Proposals are welcome on any aspect of digital technologies and their application to the humanities and/or social sciences. We highly encourage projects that focus on the collaborative nature of research and teaching. Senior scholars should foreground the labor of students, librarians, and/or the community that sustained the project. We especially welcome proposals with representative and inclusive speaker involvement.

Presentations may take the form of short papers, panel discussions or roundtables, workshops, poster sessions, or showcase demonstration. All panels and workshops will take place over 1.5 hours, unless otherwise requested. If you are interested in running a longer hackathon, please email contact@keystonedh.network. The conference will include allotted times for a poster session and showcase demonstrations (including presentations that use the Loretta C. Duckworth Scholars Studio’s VR Lab and/or Makerspace). Please keep in mind that presentations and documents will be expected to meet accessibility guidelines.

In the linked Google Form, please submit your name, email address, title, and type of your proposed presentation, as well as a proposal of 200-300 words. The proposal deadline has been extended to February 1, 2020, and proposers will be notified by early March 2020.

We will be offering a number of student bursaries to support those presenting at the conference. This will include a conference fee waiver and funds to partially cover travel and accommodations.


Keystone DH 2020 Organizing Committee
    American Philosophical Society
    Bryn Mawr College
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Haverford College
    Johns Hopkins University
    Lehigh University
    Rosemont College
    Rowan University
    Rutgers University
    Swarthmore College
    Science History Institute
    Temple University
    University of Delaware
    University of Pennsylvania
    Villanova University

7th Annual Digital Pedagogy Institute Conference

The 7th Annual Digital Pedagogy Institute (DPI) Conference will be held August 5th – 6th, 2020 at the University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, ON.

Attended by faculty, researchers, graduate students, educational developers, librarians, and many other university personnel, this two-day conference includes keynote addresses, presentations, workshops, and digital tool training that focus on the innovative use of digital technologies to enhance and transform undergraduate and graduate teaching. Keep your eye out for the call for proposals early 2020.

What is Digital Pedagogy and how does it relate to you?

Read Digital Pedagogy – A Guide for Librarians, Faculty, and Students.

The DPI Conference explores:

· digital pedagogy best practices in STEM, the Humanities or Social Sciences;

· digital pedagogy collaborations between faculty, educational developers, librarians, and/or graduate/undergraduate students;

· digital pedagogy collaborations with organizations outside the academy;

· the state of digital pedagogy education in higher education;

· digital pedagogy case studies, including course and assignment innovations;

· innovative new uses for traditional digital pedagogy tools

The Digital Pedagogy Institute is a partnership between Brock University, University of Guelph, University of Toronto Scarborough Library, University of Waterloo, and Ryerson University.

What you can do now!

1. Learn more at the DPI conference website: https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/conferences/digital-pedagogy-institute/

2. Follow us on Twitter: @DPIConference

Global Digital Humanities Symposium – Call for Proposals

Call for Proposals
Deadline: November 1
Proposal form
Digital Humanities at Michigan State University is proud to extend its symposium series on Global DH (msuglobaldh.org) into its fifth year, on March 26-27, 2020. Digital humanities scholarship continues to be driven by work at the intersections of a range of distinct disciplines and an ethical commitment to preserve and broaden access to cultural materials. In celebration of the 10th anniversary of MSU’s Cultural Heritage Informatics Program, we particularly encourage proposals along that theme, but as always we strive to showcase DH work in all its forms.

Alongside the expansion of digital humanities in under-resourced and underrepresented areas, a number of complex issues surface, including, among others, questions of ownership, cultural theft, virtual exploitation, digital rights, endangered data, and the digital divide. DH communities have raised and responded to these issues, pushing the field forward. This symposium is an opportunity to broaden the conversation about these issues. Scholarship that works across borders with foci on transnational partnerships and globally accessible data is especially welcome. Additionally, we define the term “humanities” rather broadly to incorporate the discussion of issues that encourage interdisciplinary understanding of the humanities.                                          

Focused on these issues of social justice, we invite work at the intersections of critical DH; race and ethnicity; feminism, intersectionality, and gender; and anti-colonial and postcolonial frameworks to participate.

This symposium, which will include a mixture of presentation types, welcomes 300-word proposals related to any of these issues, and particularly on the following themes and topics by Friday, November 1, midnight in your timezone:

• Critical cultural studies and analytics
• Cultural heritage in a range of contexts, particularly non-Western
• DH as socially engaged humanities and/or as a social movement
• Open data, open access, and data preservation as resistance, especially in a postcolonial context
• How identity categories, and their intersections, shape digital humanities work
• Global research dialogues and collaborations within the digital humanities community
• Indigeneity – anywhere in the world – and the digital
• Digital humanities, postcolonialism, and neocolonialism
• Global digital pedagogies
• Borders, migration, and/or diaspora and their connection to the digital
• Digital and global languages and literatures
• Digital humanities, the environment, and climate change
• Innovative and emergent technologies across institutions, languages, and economies
• Scholarly communication and knowledge production in a global context
• Surveillance and/or data privacy issues in a global context
• Productive failure

 Presentation Formats:

• 5-minute lightning talk
• 15-minute presentation
• 90-minute workshop
• 90-minute panel
• Poster presentation
• There will be a limited number of slots available for 15-minute virtual presentations

Please note that we conduct a double-blind review process, so please refrain from identifying your institution or identity in your proposal.

Submit a proposal here

Notifications of acceptance will be given by December 9, 2019