Introduction to IIIF (International Image Interoperability Framework)

Friday, October 30, 10:00 am – 11:30 am, online synchronous (Instructors: Caterina Agostini, Rutgers Italian, and Danielle Reay, Drew University Library)

This workshop will explore the International Image Interoperability Framework (https://iiif.io/) and the work of the IIIF community to create universal standards for describing and sharing images online. With common viewing platforms, we can obtain interoperable digital image content to display, edit, annotate, and share images on the web, for example artworks, maps, and musical scores.

Please register here:

https://libcal.rutgers.edu/event/7191035

Do More with Digital Scholarship workshop series

The Lewis & Ruth Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship and the McMaster University Library are pleased to share its 2020-2021 Do More with Digital Scholarship workshop series. This year’s fully virtual series consists of a mix of synchronous sessions and asynchronous modules, which will be released at various points of the year and available to watch at any time.

The series is open to all audiences. The events are listed below with registration/reminder links. The first module opens today!

More details on the workshops can be found here.

1. Introduction to Digitization

Asynchronous workshop  | available 05-October, 2020 | view now
Follow-up drop-in sessions | 16 & 26-October, 2020 | 11:30-12:30 ET | 
register

Instructor: Krista Jamieson

2. Roundtable on Digital Scholarship

Synchronous event | 30-October, 2020 | 3:00 – 4:30 ET | register

Facilitator: Andrea Zeffiro
Participants: Helen Beny, Emily Van Haren, Adrianna Michell, Amanda Montague

3. Textual Analysis with Voyant

Synchronous workshop | 04-November, 2020 | 11:30 – 1:30 ET | register

Instructor: Devon Mordell

4. Data Visualization with Tableau

Synchronous workshop | 18-November, 2020 | 11:30 – 1:30 ET | register

Instructor: Devon Mordell

5. Social Media Research Ethics – Preliminary Considerations

Asynchronous workshop | available 18-January, 2021 | register
Instructors: Andrea Zeffiro, Emily Van Haren, Jay Brodeur

6. Network Analysis with Gephi

Synchronous workshop | 20-January, 2021 | 11:30 – 1:30 ET | register

Instructor: Devon Mordell

7. Journal Publishing

Synchronous workshop | 26-January, 2021 | 1:00 – 2:30 ET | register

Instructors: Gabriela Mircea, Olga Perkovic

8. Data Wrangling with OpenRefine
Asynchronous workshop | available 01-February, 2021 | register 
Follow-up drop-in session | 11-February, 2021 | 11:30-12:30 ET | register
Instructor: Jay Brodeur

9. Introduction to Digital Exhibits with Omeka-S

Asynchronous workshop | available 08-February, 2021 | register 
Follow-up drop-in session | 24-February, 2021 | 11:30-12:30 ET | register
Instructor: Amanda Montague

10. Social Media Research Ethics – Project Design

Asynchronous workshop | available 22-February, 2021 | register

Instructors: Andrea Zeffiro, Emily Van Haren, Jay Brodeur

11. Roundtable on Social Media Research Ethics – Power and Provocations

Synchronous event | 26-March, 2021 | 10:00 – 11:30 ET | register

Facilitators: Andrea Zeffiro, Emily Van Haren, Jay Brodeur

Programming for Humanists Fall Course

Programming for Humanists, run at Texas A&M will offer Zoom-based courses this fall. Registration is open now and closes on September 2. For details, and to register, see http://programming4humanists.tamu.edu/overview/

Digital Editions, Start to Finish (8 weeks)

This course is designed for Humanities scholars who wish to create a digital edition of a text that is scholarly quality and can be peer-reviewed for promotion and tenure and/or used in classes for students who need access to rare texts. Students will learn all the basics of what Elena Pierazzo has described as “a new publication form called the ‘digital documentary edition’ which is composed of the source, the outputs and the tools able to produce and display them.” In this class, we will spend three weeks learning TEI encoding, the code used to create scholarly digital editions, as we will explain, and then will learn how to transform them into web pages using oXygen. Registration includes a one-year subscription to oXygen. Readings and lessons assigned before class meetings will take approximately two hours per week to complete. ($500)

HTML and CSS (6 weeks)

This class is for absolute beginners who know nothing about the code that lies behind the web sites as seen in browsers such as Google Chrome or Safari.  There are other sources available for learning HTML and CSS, but in this class, students will actually create HTML and CSS files during class time, along with the instructor; making mistakes is integral to learning the coding system, and so going over mistakes is an essential part of the course curriculum. The class consists of workshops in which everyone follows along, making HTML pages and styling them with CSS (Cascading Stylesheets). When problems arise, students will share their screens with everyone, and we will troubleshoot together. We will be using oXygen to create and edit both HTML and CSS.  Registration includes a one-year subscription to oXygen.  Note: Students who do not already have server space for web publishing will need to purchase or activate via your university web-accessible server space (e.g., Reclaim Hosting $30 per year, not covered by the registration fee).  Assignments requiring an hour to complete will be given at the end of every class to prepare you for the next one. ($400)

Taking both classes costs only $750 or $2,500 for 5 participants from the same institution.

Digitorium 2020

The University of Alabama University Libraries is proud to announce the annual Digital Humanities Conference, Digitorium, will be held October 1-3, 2020. The conference, hosted by the University of Alabama Libraries and the Alabama Digital Humanities Center, will be entirely virtual for the first time this year. In an unprecedented time when digital literacies are critically important, Digitorium represents a timely opportunity for faculty, practitioners, and students to learn what’s possible with Digital Humanities (DH) methods and pedagogy. This year, we will offer several workshops that can help build DH skills, with tools such as Nvivo, Orange, 360 videos in VR, and Twine.  

While we are disappointed that we won’t be able to meet in person, we’re looking forward to providing an opportunity for faculty, practitioners, and students worldwide to engage with discussions on Digital Humanities, hear from innovative scholars in the field, and to learn new skills through virtual workshops.

Registration is $25.00 and opens August 16th , 2020.

For more information regarding our schedule, plenaries, and registration, please visit the Digitorium site.

Choosing Tools for DH Research?

A recent article, “Which DH Tools Are Actually Used in Research?, ” by Laure Barbot, Frank Fischer, Yoann Moranville and Ivan Pozdniakov analyzed tools mentioned in the last five years of the Digital Humanities Conference run by the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations.

Among the top tools were Python, Twitter, Gephi, and Omeka. The article also demonstrates different visualizations styles for the data, including the one above.

The authors also created a network graph overview of tools mentioned in the Programming Historian.

Applications open for Second Digital Humanities Research Institute – New York City

Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI): Further Expanding Communities of Digital Humanities Practice

by Kalle Westerling

Do you want to become a DHRI Community Leader?

Apply now and join us from June 15-24, 2020.

You are invited to apply for the second Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI), which will take place at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. This ten-day institute will introduce participants to core digital humanities skills, and help you develop those skills as part of a growing community of leaders at universities, libraries, archives, museums, and scholarly societies.

Apply here. Applications must be received by March 2, 2020.

What to expect:

  • 8 days of in-person workshops focused on foundational digital research skills like the command line, data and ethics, introduction to python, and mapping,
  • mentoring to help grow local partnerships and launch your local version of the Digital Humanities Research Institutes,
  • sharing your experience through a final report and evaluations that will be included in our Guide to Leading Digital Humanities Research Institutes,
  • a stipend of $3,600.

Who should apply?

We encourage applications from humanities scholars from a wide range of institutional types, including but not limited to universities, community colleges, libraries, archives, museums, historical associations and who fill an array of professional roles (graduate students, experienced faculty, librarians, administrators, museum curators, archivists and more). No previous technical experience is required—applications will not be evaluated based on familiarity with existing technologies.

If you have questions about the form, the application process, or the evaluation criteria, see our application page or contact info@dhinstitutes.org.

The Digital Humanities Research Institute is made possible through generous funding from the Office of Digital Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities and with the support of the Provost’s Office of the CUNY Graduate Center and GC Digital Initiatives.

Call for Papers: Digitorium 2020

Digitorium 2020 CFP

by Anne Ladyem McDivitt

We’re very excited to invite proposals for Digitorium 2020, a multi-disciplinary Digital Humanities conference held at the University of Alabama from October 1-3, 2020. We seek proposals from a range of people including those who are brand new in the field of digital humanities, experienced scholars, practitioners, students, and anybody in-between to create an inclusive environment where everybody can learn something from each other. Proposals should demonstrate how we as digital humanists can engage with communities and our scholarship in new and innovative ways using digital methods.

This year, we will be celebrating the 6th year of Digitorium, as well as the 10th anniversary of the Alabama Digital Humanities Center. To celebrate those milestones, our theme this year will be “Progress.” This could be progress that the field has made in a particular area, how we continue to progress, or where we could improve digital humanities to further progress the field. We welcome creativity in your proposals! If you have any questions about whether your proposal might fit, please contact us at adhc@lib.ua.edu.

Participants can submit proposals that engage with one of the following:

  • Digital Methods: presentations that use digital methods to further scholarship in established fields or highlight new and exciting areas in their research subjects.
  • Public Scholarship: presentations on utilizing digital methods to engage the public through institutions such as universities, libraries, and museums.
  • Digital Pedagogy: presentations on using digital methods for innovative approaches to teaching at any level.

Presentations include a variety of formats for the conference, but they are not limited to those listed below. For example, presentations could be:

  • -20 minute papers
  • -Workshops where the presenter teaches a digital method or tool (let us know what the specifications are for the workshop)-Posters
  • -Completed or in-progress project demonstrations
  • -Panel discussions

Deadline for submitting abstracts is March 15, 2020.

All proposals should be made via the Submissions page on the conference website.

Please visit our website for more information as it becomes available regarding the plenary speakers, the venue, and the departments generously offering their support for Digitorium 2020.

Contact Email: adhc@lib.ua.edu
URL: https://adhc.lib.ua.edu/digitorium/?page_id=36

Digital Humanities Fellowships at the American Philosophical Society

The Center for Digital Scholarship (CDS) at the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum in Philadelphia invites applications for Digital Humanities Fellowships. These fellowships, for up to 2 months, are open to scholars at all stages of their careers, including graduate students, who are developing digital projects that: 1) utilize the APS Library & Museum collections, open datasets, or other APS holdings to advance a digital component of an independent research project, or, 2) seek to apply existing tools and expertise to digital projects developed in collaboration with the Library & Museum’s Center for Digital Scholarship.

Successful applicants will receive a stipend of $3,000 per month for a minimum of one month and a maximum of two months.

Recent examples of collaborative projects have focused on the Center’s Open Data Initiative and have explored datasets created from Benjamin Franklin’s postal records, indenture records for servants and redemptioners coming through the port of Philadelphia during the 1770s, and a network visualization of correspondence networks of women scientists found in the APS’s collections.

The APS Library & Museum’s collections make it among the premier institutions for documenting and exhibiting the history of the American Revolution and founding, the history of science from Newton to NASA, Native American languages and culture, and the development of American anthropology. The Library & Museum houses over 13 million manuscripts; 350,000 volumes of printed materials and bound periodicals; 250,000 images, fine art, and other objects; thousands of maps and prints; and more than 3,500 hours of audio recordings of Native American languages.

Comprehensive, searchable guides and finding aids to our collections are available online at www.amphilsoc.org/library and http://amphilsoc.pastperfectonline.com/.

The Center for Digital Scholarship promotes the holdings of the APS Library & Museum through digitization, digital humanities, and the development of tools and software. We partner with scholars, institutions, and students from across the country to explore what digital scholarship means in a small, independent research library. We ask questions about our role within the field of digital scholarship, and we find answers through practice and experimentation. To learn more about the Center for Digital Scholarship, and to explore our recent projects, please visit us here.

All application materials will be submitted online via Interfolio (https://apply.interfolio.com/69515) by Friday, March 6, 2020 at 11:59 pm EST.

Applicants must submit:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Proposal for a digital project including a detailed work plan and a proposed timeline for the fellowship term (no more than 4 double-spaced pages)
  • Examples of previous digital humanities projects (if available)
  • Two confidential letters of reference

Contact regarding the Fellowship program and the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum may be directed to Adrianna Link, Ph.D., Head of Scholarly Programs, at alink@amphilsoc.org or by phone at 215-440-3415.

Applicants: Please use Interfolio’s help desk for any issues pertaining to the online application process.

Digital Humanities Research Institute (NYC) Applications Open

Do you want to become a DHRI Community Leader?
Apply now and join us from June 15-24, 2020.



You are invited to apply for the second Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI), which will take place at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. This ten-day institute will introduce participants to core digital humanities skills, and help you develop those skills as part of a growing community of leaders at universities, libraries, archives, museums, and scholarly societies.

Apply here. Applications must be received by March 2, 2020.

What to expect: 

  • 8 days of in-person workshops focused on foundational digital research skills like the command line, data and ethics, introduction to python, and mapping,
  • mentoring to help grow local partnerships and launch your local version of the Digital Humanities Research Institutes,
  • sharing your experience through a final report and evaluations that will be included in our Guide to Leading Digital Humanities Research Institutes,
  • a stipend of $3,600.

Who should apply?

We encourage applications from humanities scholars from a wide range of institutional types, including but not limited to universities, community colleges, libraries, archives, museums, historical associations and who fill an array of professional roles (graduate students, experienced faculty, librarians, administrators, museum curators, archivists and more). No previous technical experience is required—applications will not be evaluated based on familiarity with existing technologies.

If you have questions about the form, the application process, or the evaluation criteria, see our application page or contact info@dhinstitutes.org.

The Digital Humanities Research Institute is made possible through generous funding from the Office of Digital Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities and with the support of the Provost’s Office of the CUNY Graduate Center and GC Digital Initiatives.

NEH Summer Institute: Engaging Geography in the Humanities (Boston)

Engaging Geography in the Humanities is a three-week Summer Institute to be held at Northeastern University from July 6 – 24, 2020. The Institute will explore the possibilities and productive tensions at the intersection of geography and the humanities. By engaging with readings, lectures, discussions, workshops, and field visits, the Institute will introduce scholars teaching in the humanities (and related disciplines) to concepts and methods from geography, as participants consider how these approaches can enhance their own research and teaching.

The poet Walt Whitman writes that in the urban environment we see “the past, the future, dwelling there, like space, inseparable together.”  Inspired by this idea, the Institute will use Boston as our classroom to explore the layered nature of space and place, as well as how Boston and the region have served as setting and inspiration for a range of philosophical and literary works. At the same time, the geographic perspectives and spatial methods developed here will help participants engage more deeply with their immediate surrounds, as well as distant locations.

Through a series of workshops, the Institute will introduce participants to the emerging field of digital humanities and some of its possibilities for spatial representation and analysis. Participants will be exposed to digital projects and receive hands-on training on tools such as 3D modeling, web mapping, and Geographical Information System (GIS). In addition to providing practical skills, sessions and workshops will critically examine the meanings of maps and uses of digital technology in humanistic inquiries.

Meanwhile, the Institute will build on Northeastern’s commitment to public humanities and the experiential liberal arts to facilitate more public facing engagements through popular writing, digital media, and memorialization and public history projects.

Please apply to participate by March 1, 2020.

Our goal is to create a diverse cohort of college and university faculty interested in exploring how geographic perspectives and spatial methods can enhance their own teaching and research. The Institute welcomes scholars in the humanities (and related fields) who currently engage themes of space and place in their work, as well as those interested in learning how to do so.

We would like to acknowledge the territory on which Northeastern University stands, which is that of The Wampanoag and The Massachusett People. While visiting campus, please honor the continued efforts of the Native and Indigenous community leaders who work to preserve the history and culture of the tribes which make up Eastern Massachusetts and the surrounding region. Today, Boston is still home to many indigenous peoples, including the Mashpee Wampanoag and Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), and many more in our region.