Digital Humanities Research Institute (NYC) Applications Open

Do you want to become a DHRI Community Leader?
Apply now and join us from June 15-24, 2020.



You are invited to apply for the second Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI), which will take place at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. This ten-day institute will introduce participants to core digital humanities skills, and help you develop those skills as part of a growing community of leaders at universities, libraries, archives, museums, and scholarly societies.

Apply here. Applications must be received by March 2, 2020.

What to expect: 

  • 8 days of in-person workshops focused on foundational digital research skills like the command line, data and ethics, introduction to python, and mapping,
  • mentoring to help grow local partnerships and launch your local version of the Digital Humanities Research Institutes,
  • sharing your experience through a final report and evaluations that will be included in our Guide to Leading Digital Humanities Research Institutes,
  • a stipend of $3,600.

Who should apply?

We encourage applications from humanities scholars from a wide range of institutional types, including but not limited to universities, community colleges, libraries, archives, museums, historical associations and who fill an array of professional roles (graduate students, experienced faculty, librarians, administrators, museum curators, archivists and more). No previous technical experience is required—applications will not be evaluated based on familiarity with existing technologies.

If you have questions about the form, the application process, or the evaluation criteria, see our application page or contact info@dhinstitutes.org.

The Digital Humanities Research Institute is made possible through generous funding from the Office of Digital Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities and with the support of the Provost’s Office of the CUNY Graduate Center and GC Digital Initiatives.

NEH Summer Institute: Engaging Geography in the Humanities (Boston)

Engaging Geography in the Humanities is a three-week Summer Institute to be held at Northeastern University from July 6 – 24, 2020. The Institute will explore the possibilities and productive tensions at the intersection of geography and the humanities. By engaging with readings, lectures, discussions, workshops, and field visits, the Institute will introduce scholars teaching in the humanities (and related disciplines) to concepts and methods from geography, as participants consider how these approaches can enhance their own research and teaching.

The poet Walt Whitman writes that in the urban environment we see “the past, the future, dwelling there, like space, inseparable together.”  Inspired by this idea, the Institute will use Boston as our classroom to explore the layered nature of space and place, as well as how Boston and the region have served as setting and inspiration for a range of philosophical and literary works. At the same time, the geographic perspectives and spatial methods developed here will help participants engage more deeply with their immediate surrounds, as well as distant locations.

Through a series of workshops, the Institute will introduce participants to the emerging field of digital humanities and some of its possibilities for spatial representation and analysis. Participants will be exposed to digital projects and receive hands-on training on tools such as 3D modeling, web mapping, and Geographical Information System (GIS). In addition to providing practical skills, sessions and workshops will critically examine the meanings of maps and uses of digital technology in humanistic inquiries.

Meanwhile, the Institute will build on Northeastern’s commitment to public humanities and the experiential liberal arts to facilitate more public facing engagements through popular writing, digital media, and memorialization and public history projects.

Please apply to participate by March 1, 2020.

Our goal is to create a diverse cohort of college and university faculty interested in exploring how geographic perspectives and spatial methods can enhance their own teaching and research. The Institute welcomes scholars in the humanities (and related fields) who currently engage themes of space and place in their work, as well as those interested in learning how to do so.

We would like to acknowledge the territory on which Northeastern University stands, which is that of The Wampanoag and The Massachusett People. While visiting campus, please honor the continued efforts of the Native and Indigenous community leaders who work to preserve the history and culture of the tribes which make up Eastern Massachusetts and the surrounding region. Today, Boston is still home to many indigenous peoples, including the Mashpee Wampanoag and Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), and many more in our region.

DH Workshops at Guelph

The DH@Guelph team is excited to announce that registration is now live for our DH@Guelph Summer Workshops 2020.  Please save the dates of May 4-7th 2020 and join us for what promises to be an exciting week. 
Our keynote address will be delivered by the wonderful Angel David Nieves, and we’re thrilled to welcome the fab folks from Feral Feminisms for a panel on open, feminist publishing!

Our Courses:

1. Materializing the Collection (Milena Radzikowska, Dr. Shana MacDonald)

2. Computational Digital Humanities: Command Line Fundamentals (David J. Birnbaum, Emma Schwarz)

3. Reading the Humanities from a Distance: A Survey of Text Analysis Tools (Jennifer Marvin)

4. Semantic Text Analysis with Word Embeddings (Lisa Baer)

5. Equity in Digital Publishing (Ela Przybylo, Amy Verhaeghe, Sharifa Patel, Krista Benson, Jae Basiliere)

6. Spatial Humanities: Exploring GIS in the Humanities (Quin Shirk-Luckett, Teresa Lewitsky)

7. Machine Learning and Digital Humanities (Dr. Rachel Starry, Paul Barrett, Nathan Taback)

8. Linked Data and Ontologies for the Humanities (Susan Brown, Kim Martin, Deb Stacey)

9. Getting Going with Scholarship Online: An Introduction to CWRC (Mihaela Illovan, Susan Brown) You can register at this link, and don’t hesitate to email dhguelph[@]uoguelph.ca with any questions or concerns. 
Warmly, 
Kim Martin (Associate Director)Susan Brown (Director)DH@Guelph

Call for Papers – NJIT Digital Humanities Showcase 2020

We are inviting proposals from NJ, NY and from around the region for the NJIT Digital Humanities Showcase 2020 to take place on Friday, April 17, 2020. Please see below the call for proposals or here. Deadline to submit an abstract is March 1.


CFP: NJIT Digital Humanities Showcase 2020Friday, April 17, 2020, 11:30am-2:00pmDigital Humanities at NJIT (DH@NJIT) invites proposals for the annual DH Showcase. The Showcase brings together researchers, scholars, librarians, and technologists in the humanities from around the region to present current projects and research work, while investigating broader ideas in the digital humanities as a growing field of intellectual inquiry.

The Showcase is interested in proposals for short papers and digital posters/demonstrations. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Big Data in digital humanities
  • Digital approaches to textual studies
  • Public digital humanities
  • Creative coding and electronic literature
  • Spatial analysis, mapping
  • Digital art/architectural history
  • Sound
  • Digital accessibility
  • Digital humanities pedagogy
  • Preserving and sustaining digital humanities projects
  • Digital gaming, critical play, game design, and gaming culture
  • Studies on the uses and behaviors of social media sites users
  • Community-based online media practices
  • Digital humanities project design/management
  • Institutional DH partnerships and project-based collaborations

We hope the Showcase will stimulate interdisciplinary dialogue and cross traditional professional barriers. We are particularly interested in international and underserved populations’ perspectives on digital humanities and computer science.

Interested applicants are invited to submit a title and 200-300 word abstract along with a 2-page CV by March 1, 2020 using the Submission Form (https://forms.gle/e1fPovrf4JHTSo8z8). NJIT Digital Humanities Showcase 2020 welcomes submissions in the following formats:

Short paper  (7 minutes)

Digital poster/project demonstration

The event is free and open to the public.

Antwerp Summer School in Digital Humanities: Making a Digital Edition – Basic Skills and Technologies

Focus: Digital Scholarly Editing, Raspberry Pi, Command Line, HTML, JSON, TEI-XML, XPath, XSLT, eXist-db

Dates: 29 June -3 July

Place: Antwerp (Belgium)

Price: €150 (early bird);  €200 (regular) 

Deadline: 16 March (early bird); 6 April (regular)

From 29 June to 3 July 2020, the University of Antwerp’s Centre for Digital humanities and literary Criticism (ACDC) is organising its third annual Summer School in Digital Humanities

Course Description

The summer school will exist of an intensive 5-day entry level hands-on course on making digital scholarly editions. Over the course of the week, participants will gradually learn how to transcribe and describe textual cultural heritage documents in TEI-compliant XML, process their transcriptions using related X-technologies (Xpath and XSLT), and prepare them for the web. Specifically, participants will set up a Local Area Network of Raspberry Pi minicomputers to develop an eXist-db XML database for hosting and sharing their materials in the form of a digital scholarly edition.

As students will be introduced to these technologies step by step, the course requires no prior skills or knowledge – other than to complete a minor autodidactic exercise to make sure everyone has a basic understanding of some of the core technologies the course will build on (HTML, CSS, Command Line).

Keynote Speaker

The organizers are happy to announce that the summer school’s keynote lecture will be presented by prof. dr. Elena Pierazzo, Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Tours, at the Centre d’Études Superieures de la Renaissance where she directs the MA program in Digital Humanities and approaches to the digitisation of cultural heritage materials (Intelligence des Patronises). 

Professor Pierazzo has been the Chair of the Text Encoding Initiative for two mandates, and has served for two mandates in the TEI Technical Council and was involved in the TEI user-community, with a special interest in the transcription, edition and cataloguing of modern and medieval manuscripts. She was co-chairs the working group on digital editions of the European Network NeDiMAH and one of the scientist in chief for DiXiT  a Marie Curie ITN devoted to the training of doctoral students to the practice of digital scholarly editing. And in 2019, she was invited by the ADHO (Alliance of the Digital Humanities Organisation) as the co-Chair of the Program Committee of the DH2019 in Utrecht.

Although this lecture is part of the summer school’s official programme, the keynote will be organised in the context of the University of Antwerp’s platform{DH} Lecture Series, and opened up to the larger public. 

Registration

Registration for the summer starts from €150 (early bird) and closes on Monday 6 April (regular). For more information on the application procedure, please visit our registration page

As a training event, the summer school is organised in conjunction with CLARIAH-VL – a collaborative infrastructure project across Flemish universities to which ACDC and the platform{DH} are affiliated. For more detailed information about the summer school and our programme, please visit our website: https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/summer-schools/digital-humanities/

Dip Into NYC Digital Humanities Week

Workshops have been organized, speakers have been invited, and spaces reserved. NYCDH Week 2020 is officially one week away. With more than 40 workshops, demos, and events (our most ever), a robust Kickoff Event on Monday which includes graduate student awards, themed panel, keynote speaker, lightning talks, and the presentation of the NYCDH Award, and a chance to meet hundreds of active and involved colleagues NYCDH Week is going to be a blast! So here are a few announcements.

First of all, we are proud to announce that Matthew K. Gold will be the recipient of the NYCDH Award for his significant contributions to the NYCDH community. Past NYCDH Award winner Steven Brier will be presenting Matt with the award at the Kickoff Event. Read about Matt’s work and the NYCDH Award here.

Second, our panel on Histories and Representations of Communities Across the Five Boroughs is finalized and will feature Monxo López from the Museum of the City of New York, Shawn Hill and Desislava Stoeva of Fordham University, and Sara B. Cohn from City College, CUNY. You can read more about the panel and panelists here

And don’t forget that Matt Knutzen of the NYPL will be providing the keynote at the Kickoff Event as well. Read about Matt here

The Kickoff Event on Monday, February 3 is almost already fully registered so sign up fast!

Perhaps most importantly however is it is time to sign up for workshops, demos, and events. The NYCDH Week website has been fully updated with topics, times, and locations, so now is the time to find out what appeals to you most. Along with some old regulars we have a lot of new sessions this year so there is bound to be something for everyone. You can look at the sessions by either browsing by title on this page, or looking at the weekly schedule here (for daily listings use the pulldown menu in the top navigation).

We look forward to a great week and to see new and familiar faces alike throughout the city next week. Enjoy!

Reading (as) Data: Literary History with Mass-Digitized Collections

All are welcome to attend this talk

12:00 to 1:30pm, Friday, January 31, 2020. NYU Department of English, Event Space
244 Greene St, Room 106

In Australia in the 19th and early 20th centuries, newspapers were the main source of fiction, local and imported. Fast forward to the 21st century, and the National Library of Australia’s Trove database hosts the largest open-access, mass-digitized collection of historical newspapers internationally. This fortunate confluence of technological systems (newspapers and mass-digitization) made possible the discovery of a transnational collection of over 21,000 publications of novels, novellas and short stories in early Australian newspapers. With reference to this massively expanded record of fiction in Australia and Australian fiction, this paper poses some key questions for literary and reading history in the mass-digitised age. Is bigger always better in computational literary studies? What new data-rich methods are useful for literary and reading history? And what happens to all this data when our projects finish?

The speaker is Katherine Bode, Professor of literary and textual studies at the Australian National University and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow (2018-2022). She is the author of books including A World of Fiction: Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History (2018) and Reading by Numbers: Recalibrating the Literary Field (2012).

Call for Papers — 2020 Culture Mapping Symposium

NewYorkScapes, NYUDH, and the Digital Culture/s Colloquium are thrilled to announce the 2020 Culture Mapping Symposium, to take place April 17-18 at NYU’s Washington Square campus. The deadline for submissions is February 17, 2020.

This year, we are also glad to be able to offer two travel grants for students and/or early career practitioners. Simply apply inside the submission form! Presenters can expect to hear back in March.

CULTURE MAPPING 2020: FUTURES

CALL FOR PAPERS, PROJECTS, AND WORKS-IN-PROGRESS

In Numbered Lives: Life and Death in Quantum Media, scholar and feminist digital humanities practitioner Jacqueline Wernimont examines recordkeeping technologies used to account for human lives and bodies, beginning as early as the 15th century. The book, in part a robust critical historiography, challenges us to interrogate and engage mindfully with contemporary data issues and methods, and with the ways in which they shape our narratives regarding the value of lives and cultures.

In the introduction, Dr. Wernimont describes the project as “speculative and experimental, reading mediations and making a mess of apparent order in service of alternative futures.” By tracing the long, fraught histories of technologies of human enumeration, Numbered Lives refuses to take for granted the epistemological and ontological models undergirding quotidian quantum media; for Wernimont, it is through this interdisciplinary and media-archaeological that “we can [perhaps] find matrices that will help us create more just futures.”

Culture Mapping 2020 takes the occasion of a new decade to assemble scholars, students, artists, and other practitioners to reflect together on their own work and processes to a similar end: in service of alternative, capacious futures that feature justice, accessibility, and critical pedagogy as core concerns. We invite proposals that explore the intersection of culture studies, “mapping” in its myriad registers, and digital methods through the lens of this theme.

Proposals from across the humanities, arts, and social sciences are welcome. Faculty, librarians, graduate and undergraduate students, staff and administrators, and community members are all encouraged to participate. Potential areas of engagement include but are not limited to:

• Digital cartography & GIS as tools for humanities research and teaching

• Visualizing literary and historical materials, including speculative fiction

• Digital-born media, art, literature, and games that thematize futurity

• Resistant, anti-racist, decolonial, indigenous, and feminist mapping

• City and community planning; urban studies

• Speculative design and emerging technologies, including XR and participatory media

• Activist methodologies and pedagogies

• Data management planning and digital project maintenance

Submissions can take the form of traditional paper / project presentations (10-20 minutes), five-minute lightning talks, performances, installations, or roundtables (30-40 minutes). You may also propose a workshop on a methodology — technical or otherwise — in which you have expertise and which you feel would be of broad interest.

To submit a proposal, please complete the online submission form. The submission deadline is February 17, 2019.

Call for Papers, American Studies Association

DH, Small and Radical

A guaranteed session sponsored by the Digital Humanities Caucus, American Studies Association Annual Meeting, November 12-15, 2020, Baltimore, Maryland

The Digital Humanities Caucus of the American Studies Association invites proposals for papers that consider the topic “Small DH” under the ASA 2020 conference theme, “Creativity Within Revolt.” 

Small DH can include individual scholars working on DH projects, DH programs at small and/or underfunded institutions, DH programs at Small Liberal Arts Colleges (SLACs) that have received significant grant funding for DH, and/or DH initiatives or projects that are not affiliated with an institution.

With large institutions producing big DH projects (big data, big project teams, big grants), is doing DH at small institutions a form of revolt? Can Small DH be radical, or offer the promise or potential of radical, long-lasting change? 

Additionally, DH has been viewed as a potential avenue of revolt within the academy, and alternately as a symptom of the neoliberalization of the academy (and therefore “revolting” to many). How does Small DH inform this debate, or change our understanding of DH’s potential to inspire revolt?

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Expectations of starting DH programs at small schools, with limited or no funding
  • Grant-funded DH programs at SLACs
  • Labor issues and Small DH
  • Outsized expectations and Small DH
  • Minimal computing
  • Well-funded DH projects with small research teams
  • Choosing to do DH outside of the academy
  • Ways professional organizations can/should support Small DH

Please send a 300-word proposal and a brief bio to ASAdhCaucus@gmail.com by Wednesday, January 29 at 10:00 pm ET. Decision notifications will be sent the following day.

Apply to the Venice Summer School in Digital and Public Humanities

The first edition of the Venice Summer School in Digital and Public Humanities, will be held from 6-10 July 2020, organized by the  Venice Centre for Digital and Public Humanities (VeDPH) at the Department of Humanities (DSU), Ca’ Foscari University of Venice.

The Summer School aims at providing advanced and in-depth training in theories, technologies and methods of Digital and Public Humanities, focusing on cultural, archeological, historical, literary, and artistic materials. The school will give the participants the opportunity to engage in debates about digital and public cultural heritage and humanities research, while enhancing their competences and skills of digitizing materials and sources and for modeling, analysing and visualizing multimedia humanities data. All classes will be taught in English.

The VeDPH summer school is divided into four thematic strands:
(1) Digital Textual Scholarship
(2) Digital and Public History
(3) Digital and Public Art History
(4) Digital Archaeology and its Public

The School is composed by a series of plenary lectures, parallel workshops, and site visits. Lectures will describe the greater context in which these theories and methods will be applied: a world in which the work of scholars is routinely aided by computer-assisted techniques, with both old and novel problems, challenges and solutions. With a learning-by-doing approach, participants will reflect every stage of the realisation of a digital object and on how to make use of the data in own projects. Lessons and labs will be focused on modeling, retrieving, analysing, visualising, and publishing data created on relevant sites of the city of Venice (such as the Biblioteca Marciana, Archivio di Stato, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Ghetto) and its surroundings (such as M9 Museum in Mestre, excavations at Torcello or Altino). Legal questions of intellectual property and publication licences will be covered, as well as the latest web developments, such as semantic web and linked open data technologies, in order to evaluate different data models for cultural heritage objects.

Strand #1: Digital Textual Scholarship
This strand focuses on the application of digital methods and technologies to literary and historical texts and documents, especially from Venetian archives and libraries. Introductory lessons on theories and best practices are accompanied by hands-on and laboratory sessions for their immediate implementation in collaborative project works. Participants are introduced to theories and best practices of digital scholarly editing. Aspects of textual materiality (digitisation, formal description and analysis) are covered as well as methods and standards for the encoding, annotation and transformation of texts (XML, TEI; XSLT). Finally, the integration into the semantic web (Linked Open Data, IIIF) will be preformed and tools for the enrichment, analysis and visualisation of textual data will be applied (CollateX, Natural Language Processing, Distant Reading). The strand includes a visit of the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana.

 Strand #2: Digital and Public History
This strand focuses on the application of digital techniques and a public approach to the development and presentation of historical research. The digital aspect revolves around some of the main tools used by digital historians, such as Text Mining, Network Analysis, and Historical GIS. The ‘public’ aspect is centred on the issues related to the research with the public and the dissemination beyond the classroom, from public memory to public sources to public engagement, with specific focus on topics such as TV, museums, and social media. The theoretical debate and the role played by digital and public historians in the changing landscape of the historical discipline are also considered. The strand includes a visit to M9-Museo del ‘900 in Mestre, to give the students a concrete example of how the past can be seen and shown through the digital & public lenses.

Strand #3: Digital and Public Art History
This strand focuses on the technological development and its cultural implications which occured in the arts sector over the last decades. In doing this, the digital aspect is approached both on the side of artistic production and the art system as well as on the side of museums and art historical representation. The issues of technological change, digital nativity, virtual realms and digital tools will be discussed at length and put in the context of past and recent artistic productions, art institutions and public sprawl. Both the theoretical debate and practical tools for digital art historians shall be explored by means of lectures and labs. The strand includes a visit to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice to give the students a concrete example of new digital and public approaches in art institutions.  Eventually, the strand includes the opening of an art exhibition on the analog-digital relationship by Italian painter Aldo Sergio expressly organized for the Venice Centre for Digital and Public History.

 Strand #4: Digital Archaeology and its Public
This strand focuses on theories and practices that archaeologists apply in surveys, remote sensing, spatial analysis, data collection, and data management. Participant will engage in digital strategies to analyze the heritage and visualize, share and communicate it to the public. They will approach digital heritage as a virtual tool to explore the mutual relationship between environment, humans and the past. Using the lagoon area as test case (Adria, Mira, Torcello, Altino and Caorle), the aim of the strand is to learn how critically archaeology may be engaged with the “digital”. We will work on questions such as “why, by whom and for what purpose do we cultivate digital technologies”. Digital data and public(s) are deeply connected, and nowadays archaeologists are not only asked to build set of coherent digital data from the surveys, but they have to foster methods for engaging new audiences and facing the global societal challenges. Digital tools may help the de-colonization of the archaeological practice, going beyond the mere reconstruction of the past and being able to detect and analyze the cultural and political frameworks by which we share and perpetuate the memory.

Keynote speakers: Serge Noiret (European University Institute, Florence), Elena Pierazzo (Université de Tours), and Fabio Vitali (Università di Bologna)

Guest lecturers: Peter Bell (Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg), Mirco Carrattieri (Istituto Ferruccio Parri, Milano), Frédéric Clavert (C2DH, University of Luxembourg), Lisa Dieckmann (Universität zu Köln), Francesco Frizzera (Museo della Guerra, Rovereto), Erma Hermens (Rijks Museum Amsterdam), Angus Mol (University of Leiden), Giampaolo Salice (Università di Cagliari), Miroslav Halak (Galerie Belvedere, Vienna), et al.

Lecturers from VeDPH/DSU: Federico Boschetti, Alberto Campagnolo, Leonardo Campus, Elisa Corrò, Stefano Dall’Aglio, Holger Essler, Lorenzo Calvelli, Carolina Fernández-Castrillo, Franz Fischer, Daniele Fusi, Tiziana Mancinelli, Diego Mantoan, Paolo Monella, Dorit Raines, Linda Spinazzè, Barbara Tramelli

Each strand will include 15 participants maximum.

Participation fee: €300

14 scholarships are available with an amount of € 600 each (gross payment).

Application deadline: 06.03.2020 (midnight CET)

Ranking results: 20.03.2020

Acceptance deadline: 02.04.2020

The application must be submitted via e-mail to: didattica.dsu@unive.it or via PEC (certified email) to: protocollo@pec.unive.it and bear the subject header: Application for Admission to VeSSDPH.

 The following documents may also be attached to the application:
– Application Form (see below)
– Motivation letter
– MA Diploma (or equivalent)
– CV evidence in experiences, skills and knowledge in the field
– Copy of valid ID or passport

Essential Criteria: University master/diploma (or equivalent)

Selection and Ranking Criteria (total score 20/20):
1) Motivation letter (max 16) – Reason of interest as demonstrated by a short description (max. 100 words) of an approved or ongoing research project involving Digital and Public Humanities methodologies:
a) quality of research project
b) integration of Digital and Public Humanities methods in the project
c) career perspectives
d) lack of funding / institutional support / training opportunities

2) Graduation mark (max 2), PhD (max 2)                               

Submission date will be taken into consideration in the case of candidates with equal ranking.

For further information visit https://www.unive.it/vedph or write to didattica.dsu@unive.it

Call for Application and Application Form (download):
https://www.unive.it/pag/fileadmin/user_upload/comunicazione/cafoscarinews/img/grafica/Call_for_Application_VeSSDPH.pdf